Interview with an environmentalist on the web-site for teachers and learners of English as a secondary language from a German point of view.
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Interview with an environmentalist
 
DJ/
interviewer
And now here is a break in the music to talk to Mr Miller, member of the Mono Lake Commission. Mr Miller, why is your committee fighting for the conservation of Mono Lake
Mr Miller Good Morning everyone. Mono Lake, as your listeners know, is the third largest natural lake in California. Its tufa towers along the north and south shore were formed in the salty lake water by fresh water from springs. Mono Lake is very important for Mono County, for Lee Vining and the surrounding area. Lee Vining is one of our vacation headquarters. This fine mountain village has got nice motels, restaurants and gift shops. Visitors from all over the world come and spend their vacation there. It's only 12 miles west of one of the most famous tourist attractions in America, the Yosemite National Park.
DJ/
interviewer
But the beauty of the country is not the only reason why the committee draws the public's attention to Mono Lake.
Mr Miller That's perfectly correct. May I point out that the life of the birds on the islands of Mono Lake is in danger? The surface of the water has fallen over 45 feet in the last 40 years so that one island now is joined to the shore. The result is that wild animals can reach the nests of the gulls. That's why year after year fewer gulls come to Lake Mono.
DJ/
interviewer
In my interview with Jack Johnson, a water engineer from LA, he mentioned that .............................................. .............................................. He explained that................................................................ ..........................
Mr Miller I didn't expect him to say anything else. But that's absurd. It's not that we want to stop the water supply for LA; but people must learn to save energy and material. Mono Lake, for example, could easily be saved if every resident of LA put a brick into the cistern of his toilet. It's as simple as that to save millions of gallons of water. You see. Man is part of nature. We must learn this from the Indians who say that nature doesn't belong to man, but is only lent to him. And haven't we got to think of our children and grandchildren, too?
DJ/
interviewer
I want to thank you, Mr Miller, for this interesting interview. Good-bye and good luck.
Mr Miller Thank you and please, listeners, join our campaign. Good-bye.

And here's the missing part:
 
DJ/
interviewer
In my interview with Jack Johnson, a water engineer from LA, he mentioned that it was not only a question of beauty but also of cost. He explained that LA needed the water because people were more important than gulls.


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Table of contents
Interview with
an environmentalist
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"Lake Mono" - water policy
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Interview with a water engineer
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