Co-operative learning on the web-site for teachers and learners of English as a secondary language from a German point of view
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Co-operative Learning, Durham, Ontario, Canada 1996

The purpose of the British Columbia school system is to enable learners to develop their individual potential and to acquire the knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to contribute to a healthy society and a prosperous and successful economy.

Educated Citizen:

A healthy society and a prosperous and sustainable economy are achievable when "educated citizens", striving to be the best they can be, are

Co-operative Learning

is broadly defined as an approach to organizing classroom activities so that students can interact with and learn from one another as well as from the teacher and the world around them.
 
 

Roger Johnson and David Johnson

"Most careers do not expect people to sit in rows and complete with colleagues without interacting with them. Teamwork, communication, effective co-ordination, and division of labour characterize most real-life settings. It is time for schools to more realistically reflect the reality of adult life. The most logical way to ensure that students master the co-operative skills required in most task-oriented situations is to structure the majority of academic learning situations co-operatively.


Key Elements of Co-operative Learning
A comparison of co-operative teams and traditional small groups will highlight the differences between the two types of groups. (What is printed in bold is a description of co-operative learning teams while the description of typical traditional small groups is printed in italics below it.
Research Review of Effects of Co-operative Learning
    Increased academic chievement
Increased retention
  • Improved inter-group relation

  •    (more positive heterogeneous relationships) 
  • Improved mainstreaming
  • Greater social support 
  • More on-task behaviour 
  • Better attitudes towards teachers
  • Greater intrinsic motivation
  • Better attitudes toward school
  • Improved self-esteem
  • Improved collaborative skills

  • <Click here and you will always get back to the table of contents>
    Table of Contents
    Co-operative learning HOMEback to the homepagePAGE back to the previous page back to 
    Planning a project
    in ESL: Constituents
    go on to
    Developmental teaching
    and learning
    on to the next page