Reading Comprehension: Strategies on the web-site for teachers and learners of English as a secondary language from a German point of view
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Reading Compre-
hension
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 Save time and read more effectively: Reading Comprehension Strategies

 *Every day we see lots of different texts in magazines, in newspapers, even as videotext on the TV screen. We get letters and leaflets through our letter boxes. So much reading matter that we can't read it all.

So each of us must choose what to read. How?

We look for what really interests us. We look for something new and unusual. Or for a topic which we have already studied. We want to learn more about it.

So we look at the headings of the texts. But often they mislead us. They are too sensational and the text that follows is far more boring than we expected. This problem is even greater when we read a text in a foreign language. Life is too short to read very slowly lots of material which we find boring or which cannot help us. We want to read something which gives us useful information or is enjoyable.

Reading strategies can help us with this problem.

These strategies will show you how to use headings and headlines and pictures, how to skim a text for important ideas, how to scan a text for details or important difficult new words, how to take notes and how to summarise.*

And remember: These reading strategies will also help you a lot with your studying techniques in German.

What is good reading comprehension? It is to get information from a written text as efficiently as possible, to find quickly what is important and to get all the details of this text correctly.

Before you start reading a text ask yourself:
1. Do I want 100% knowledge and understanding of the material, or only
    the main Ideas of it?

2. Why am I reading this text?
 

3. How difficult is this text? How fast can I read it?

        The degree of difficulty depends on

4) How much do you know about the subject of the text already? Remember: A good reader can let his / her eyes move very quickly over a page and
                          skim it at a speed of 1500 words per minute. Don't read single words.
                          Read words in groups.
Remember:   Concentration is very important when you want to preview efficiently.
                          To concentrate well, you have to

Now you can check how much time it takes you to read the following text. Have a stop watch ready. Ready? Steady? Go.

Every
day
we
see
lots
of
different
texts
in
magazines,
in
newspapers,
even
as
videotext
on
the
TV
screen.
We
get
letters
and
leaflets
through
our
letter
boxes.
So
much
reading
matter
that
we
can't
read
it
all.
So
each
of
us
must
choose
what
to
read.
How?

We
look
for
what
really
interests
us.
We
look
for
something
new
and
unusual.
Or
for
a
topic
which
we
have
already
studied.
We
want
to
learn
more
about
it.

So
we
look
at
the
headings
of
the
texts.
But
often
they
mislead
us.
They
are
too
sensational
and
the
text
that
follows
is
far
more
boring
than
we
expected.
This
problem
is
even
greater
when
we
read
a
text
in
a
foreign
language.
Life
is
too
short
to
read
very
slowly
lots
of
material
which
we
find
boring
or
which
cannot
help
us.
We
want
to
read
something
which
gives
us
useful
information
or
is
enjoyable.

Reading
strategies
can
help
us
with
this
problem.
These
strategies
will
show
you
how
to
use
headings
and
headlines
and
pictures,
how
to
skim
a
text
for
important
ideas,
how
to
scan
a
text
for
details
or
important
difficult
new
words,
how
to
take
notes
and
how
to
summarise.


When you have checked your time, please do the same with the above text from *asterisk to asterisk*. Then compare your reading times.


<Click here and you will always get back to the table of contents>
Table of Contents
Reading
Comprehension
HOMEback to the homepagePAGE back to the previous page back to
Pre-, while- and post-listening activities
go on to
Exercises in Reading Strategies
on to the next page